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YoutubeAsphyxiaLearn Auslan - FingerspellingA
#asphyxia #vic #fingerspelling #everywhere #nsw #act #qld #nt #sa #wa #tas
Use this video to learn how to do Auslan fingerspelling. If you can fingerspell you can communicate with any Deaf person - just spell out every word. When you fingerspell, your dominant hand (the one you write with) does most of the moving, and the subordinate hand forms the base positions. In the video I'm fingerspelling with my left hand, so if you are right handed, you should do the signs mirror-image to me. Take care that you don't bend your fingers back unnaturally while fingerspelling. Make each letter smooth - for example, you don't need to shrug your shoulders or take a deep breath for each letter - work on allowing them to flow naturally. Practise fingerspelling the alphabet until you are confident with all the letters. A good way to help make your fingerspelling smooth is to spell out the lyrics to a favourite song. It can seem incredibly cumbersome at first, but if you practise it, it will become smooth. Eventually, you may be able to spell fast enough that you can do it along with the song while it plays in real time. If you drive, practising fingerspelling at the traffic lights is a great habit! Also practise reading back fingerspelling from a friend. Learning to read back words is actually harder than learning the letters in the first place. It takes practise! Use context and what you know about your conversation to help you work out what the word might be. This video is part of my free online Auslan course. To access the entire course, and additional lessons that are not taught via video, please visit my website, https://helloasphyxia.wordpress.com/ To learn more about what it is really like to be Deaf, details about the Deaf community and how Auslan is used by Deaf people, read my book, Future Girl, https://tinyurl.com/yd27a39k

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YoutubeAsphyxiaLearn Auslan - FingerspellingB
#asphyxia #vic #fingerspelling #everywhere #nsw #act #qld #nt #sa #wa #tas
Use this video to learn how to do Auslan fingerspelling. If you can fingerspell you can communicate with any Deaf person - just spell out every word. When you fingerspell, your dominant hand (the one you write with) does most of the moving, and the subordinate hand forms the base positions. In the video I'm fingerspelling with my left hand, so if you are right handed, you should do the signs mirror-image to me. Take care that you don't bend your fingers back unnaturally while fingerspelling. Make each letter smooth - for example, you don't need to shrug your shoulders or take a deep breath for each letter - work on allowing them to flow naturally. Practise fingerspelling the alphabet until you are confident with all the letters. A good way to help make your fingerspelling smooth is to spell out the lyrics to a favourite song. It can seem incredibly cumbersome at first, but if you practise it, it will become smooth. Eventually, you may be able to spell fast enough that you can do it along with the song while it plays in real time. If you drive, practising fingerspelling at the traffic lights is a great habit! Also practise reading back fingerspelling from a friend. Learning to read back words is actually harder than learning the letters in the first place. It takes practise! Use context and what you know about your conversation to help you work out what the word might be. This video is part of my free online Auslan course. To access the entire course, and additional lessons that are not taught via video, please visit my website, https://helloasphyxia.wordpress.com/ To learn more about what it is really like to be Deaf, details about the Deaf community and how Auslan is used by Deaf people, read my book, Future Girl, https://tinyurl.com/yd27a39k

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YoutubeAsphyxiaLearn Auslan - FingerspellingC
#asphyxia #vic #fingerspelling #everywhere #nsw #act #qld #nt #sa #wa #tas
Use this video to learn how to do Auslan fingerspelling. If you can fingerspell you can communicate with any Deaf person - just spell out every word. When you fingerspell, your dominant hand (the one you write with) does most of the moving, and the subordinate hand forms the base positions. In the video I'm fingerspelling with my left hand, so if you are right handed, you should do the signs mirror-image to me. Take care that you don't bend your fingers back unnaturally while fingerspelling. Make each letter smooth - for example, you don't need to shrug your shoulders or take a deep breath for each letter - work on allowing them to flow naturally. Practise fingerspelling the alphabet until you are confident with all the letters. A good way to help make your fingerspelling smooth is to spell out the lyrics to a favourite song. It can seem incredibly cumbersome at first, but if you practise it, it will become smooth. Eventually, you may be able to spell fast enough that you can do it along with the song while it plays in real time. If you drive, practising fingerspelling at the traffic lights is a great habit! Also practise reading back fingerspelling from a friend. Learning to read back words is actually harder than learning the letters in the first place. It takes practise! Use context and what you know about your conversation to help you work out what the word might be. This video is part of my free online Auslan course. To access the entire course, and additional lessons that are not taught via video, please visit my website, https://helloasphyxia.wordpress.com/ To learn more about what it is really like to be Deaf, details about the Deaf community and how Auslan is used by Deaf people, read my book, Future Girl, https://tinyurl.com/yd27a39k

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YoutubeAsphyxiaLearn Auslan - FingerspellingD
#asphyxia #vic #fingerspelling #everywhere #nsw #act #qld #nt #sa #wa #tas
Use this video to learn how to do Auslan fingerspelling. If you can fingerspell you can communicate with any Deaf person - just spell out every word. When you fingerspell, your dominant hand (the one you write with) does most of the moving, and the subordinate hand forms the base positions. In the video I'm fingerspelling with my left hand, so if you are right handed, you should do the signs mirror-image to me. Take care that you don't bend your fingers back unnaturally while fingerspelling. Make each letter smooth - for example, you don't need to shrug your shoulders or take a deep breath for each letter - work on allowing them to flow naturally. Practise fingerspelling the alphabet until you are confident with all the letters. A good way to help make your fingerspelling smooth is to spell out the lyrics to a favourite song. It can seem incredibly cumbersome at first, but if you practise it, it will become smooth. Eventually, you may be able to spell fast enough that you can do it along with the song while it plays in real time. If you drive, practising fingerspelling at the traffic lights is a great habit! Also practise reading back fingerspelling from a friend. Learning to read back words is actually harder than learning the letters in the first place. It takes practise! Use context and what you know about your conversation to help you work out what the word might be. This video is part of my free online Auslan course. To access the entire course, and additional lessons that are not taught via video, please visit my website, https://helloasphyxia.wordpress.com/ To learn more about what it is really like to be Deaf, details about the Deaf community and how Auslan is used by Deaf people, read my book, Future Girl, https://tinyurl.com/yd27a39k

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YoutubeAsphyxiaLearn Auslan - FingerspellingE
#asphyxia #vic #fingerspelling #everywhere #nsw #act #qld #nt #sa #wa #tas
Use this video to learn how to do Auslan fingerspelling. If you can fingerspell you can communicate with any Deaf person - just spell out every word. When you fingerspell, your dominant hand (the one you write with) does most of the moving, and the subordinate hand forms the base positions. In the video I'm fingerspelling with my left hand, so if you are right handed, you should do the signs mirror-image to me. Take care that you don't bend your fingers back unnaturally while fingerspelling. Make each letter smooth - for example, you don't need to shrug your shoulders or take a deep breath for each letter - work on allowing them to flow naturally. Practise fingerspelling the alphabet until you are confident with all the letters. A good way to help make your fingerspelling smooth is to spell out the lyrics to a favourite song. It can seem incredibly cumbersome at first, but if you practise it, it will become smooth. Eventually, you may be able to spell fast enough that you can do it along with the song while it plays in real time. If you drive, practising fingerspelling at the traffic lights is a great habit! Also practise reading back fingerspelling from a friend. Learning to read back words is actually harder than learning the letters in the first place. It takes practise! Use context and what you know about your conversation to help you work out what the word might be. This video is part of my free online Auslan course. To access the entire course, and additional lessons that are not taught via video, please visit my website, https://helloasphyxia.wordpress.com/ To learn more about what it is really like to be Deaf, details about the Deaf community and how Auslan is used by Deaf people, read my book, Future Girl, https://tinyurl.com/yd27a39k

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YoutubeAsphyxiaLearn Auslan - FingerspellingF
#asphyxia #vic #fingerspelling #everywhere #nsw #act #qld #nt #sa #wa #tas
Use this video to learn how to do Auslan fingerspelling. If you can fingerspell you can communicate with any Deaf person - just spell out every word. When you fingerspell, your dominant hand (the one you write with) does most of the moving, and the subordinate hand forms the base positions. In the video I'm fingerspelling with my left hand, so if you are right handed, you should do the signs mirror-image to me. Take care that you don't bend your fingers back unnaturally while fingerspelling. Make each letter smooth - for example, you don't need to shrug your shoulders or take a deep breath for each letter - work on allowing them to flow naturally. Practise fingerspelling the alphabet until you are confident with all the letters. A good way to help make your fingerspelling smooth is to spell out the lyrics to a favourite song. It can seem incredibly cumbersome at first, but if you practise it, it will become smooth. Eventually, you may be able to spell fast enough that you can do it along with the song while it plays in real time. If you drive, practising fingerspelling at the traffic lights is a great habit! Also practise reading back fingerspelling from a friend. Learning to read back words is actually harder than learning the letters in the first place. It takes practise! Use context and what you know about your conversation to help you work out what the word might be. This video is part of my free online Auslan course. To access the entire course, and additional lessons that are not taught via video, please visit my website, https://helloasphyxia.wordpress.com/ To learn more about what it is really like to be Deaf, details about the Deaf community and how Auslan is used by Deaf people, read my book, Future Girl, https://tinyurl.com/yd27a39k

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YoutubeAsphyxiaLearn Auslan - FingerspellingG
#asphyxia #vic #fingerspelling #everywhere #nsw #act #qld #nt #sa #wa #tas
Use this video to learn how to do Auslan fingerspelling. If you can fingerspell you can communicate with any Deaf person - just spell out every word. When you fingerspell, your dominant hand (the one you write with) does most of the moving, and the subordinate hand forms the base positions. In the video I'm fingerspelling with my left hand, so if you are right handed, you should do the signs mirror-image to me. Take care that you don't bend your fingers back unnaturally while fingerspelling. Make each letter smooth - for example, you don't need to shrug your shoulders or take a deep breath for each letter - work on allowing them to flow naturally. Practise fingerspelling the alphabet until you are confident with all the letters. A good way to help make your fingerspelling smooth is to spell out the lyrics to a favourite song. It can seem incredibly cumbersome at first, but if you practise it, it will become smooth. Eventually, you may be able to spell fast enough that you can do it along with the song while it plays in real time. If you drive, practising fingerspelling at the traffic lights is a great habit! Also practise reading back fingerspelling from a friend. Learning to read back words is actually harder than learning the letters in the first place. It takes practise! Use context and what you know about your conversation to help you work out what the word might be. This video is part of my free online Auslan course. To access the entire course, and additional lessons that are not taught via video, please visit my website, https://helloasphyxia.wordpress.com/ To learn more about what it is really like to be Deaf, details about the Deaf community and how Auslan is used by Deaf people, read my book, Future Girl, https://tinyurl.com/yd27a39k

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YoutubeAsphyxiaLearn Auslan - FingerspellingH
#asphyxia #vic #fingerspelling #everywhere #nsw #act #qld #nt #sa #wa #tas
Use this video to learn how to do Auslan fingerspelling. If you can fingerspell you can communicate with any Deaf person - just spell out every word. When you fingerspell, your dominant hand (the one you write with) does most of the moving, and the subordinate hand forms the base positions. In the video I'm fingerspelling with my left hand, so if you are right handed, you should do the signs mirror-image to me. Take care that you don't bend your fingers back unnaturally while fingerspelling. Make each letter smooth - for example, you don't need to shrug your shoulders or take a deep breath for each letter - work on allowing them to flow naturally. Practise fingerspelling the alphabet until you are confident with all the letters. A good way to help make your fingerspelling smooth is to spell out the lyrics to a favourite song. It can seem incredibly cumbersome at first, but if you practise it, it will become smooth. Eventually, you may be able to spell fast enough that you can do it along with the song while it plays in real time. If you drive, practising fingerspelling at the traffic lights is a great habit! Also practise reading back fingerspelling from a friend. Learning to read back words is actually harder than learning the letters in the first place. It takes practise! Use context and what you know about your conversation to help you work out what the word might be. This video is part of my free online Auslan course. To access the entire course, and additional lessons that are not taught via video, please visit my website, https://helloasphyxia.wordpress.com/ To learn more about what it is really like to be Deaf, details about the Deaf community and how Auslan is used by Deaf people, read my book, Future Girl, https://tinyurl.com/yd27a39k

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YoutubeAsphyxiaLearn Auslan - FingerspellingI
#asphyxia #vic #fingerspelling #everywhere #nsw #act #qld #nt #sa #wa #tas
Use this video to learn how to do Auslan fingerspelling. If you can fingerspell you can communicate with any Deaf person - just spell out every word. When you fingerspell, your dominant hand (the one you write with) does most of the moving, and the subordinate hand forms the base positions. In the video I'm fingerspelling with my left hand, so if you are right handed, you should do the signs mirror-image to me. Take care that you don't bend your fingers back unnaturally while fingerspelling. Make each letter smooth - for example, you don't need to shrug your shoulders or take a deep breath for each letter - work on allowing them to flow naturally. Practise fingerspelling the alphabet until you are confident with all the letters. A good way to help make your fingerspelling smooth is to spell out the lyrics to a favourite song. It can seem incredibly cumbersome at first, but if you practise it, it will become smooth. Eventually, you may be able to spell fast enough that you can do it along with the song while it plays in real time. If you drive, practising fingerspelling at the traffic lights is a great habit! Also practise reading back fingerspelling from a friend. Learning to read back words is actually harder than learning the letters in the first place. It takes practise! Use context and what you know about your conversation to help you work out what the word might be. This video is part of my free online Auslan course. To access the entire course, and additional lessons that are not taught via video, please visit my website, https://helloasphyxia.wordpress.com/ To learn more about what it is really like to be Deaf, details about the Deaf community and how Auslan is used by Deaf people, read my book, Future Girl, https://tinyurl.com/yd27a39k

J

YoutubeAsphyxiaLearn Auslan - FingerspellingJ
#asphyxia #vic #fingerspelling #everywhere #nsw #act #qld #nt #sa #wa #tas
Use this video to learn how to do Auslan fingerspelling. If you can fingerspell you can communicate with any Deaf person - just spell out every word. When you fingerspell, your dominant hand (the one you write with) does most of the moving, and the subordinate hand forms the base positions. In the video I'm fingerspelling with my left hand, so if you are right handed, you should do the signs mirror-image to me. Take care that you don't bend your fingers back unnaturally while fingerspelling. Make each letter smooth - for example, you don't need to shrug your shoulders or take a deep breath for each letter - work on allowing them to flow naturally. Practise fingerspelling the alphabet until you are confident with all the letters. A good way to help make your fingerspelling smooth is to spell out the lyrics to a favourite song. It can seem incredibly cumbersome at first, but if you practise it, it will become smooth. Eventually, you may be able to spell fast enough that you can do it along with the song while it plays in real time. If you drive, practising fingerspelling at the traffic lights is a great habit! Also practise reading back fingerspelling from a friend. Learning to read back words is actually harder than learning the letters in the first place. It takes practise! Use context and what you know about your conversation to help you work out what the word might be. This video is part of my free online Auslan course. To access the entire course, and additional lessons that are not taught via video, please visit my website, https://helloasphyxia.wordpress.com/ To learn more about what it is really like to be Deaf, details about the Deaf community and how Auslan is used by Deaf people, read my book, Future Girl, https://tinyurl.com/yd27a39k