Home Button

see you again

Auslan SignbankDictionary#1109 see-you-again
#auslan-signbank #everywhere #wa #nt #sa #qld #nsw #act #vic #tas #b92.directional #phonology.onehand #semantic.salutation
Interactive: 1. Used alone on leave-taking to mean that you hope and expect to see that person again soon. English = 'See you again.', 'Until next time.'

hello, hi

Auslan SignbankDictionary#2309 hello1a
#auslan-signbank #everywhere #wa #nt #sa #qld #nsw #act #vic #tas #corpus.attested #iconicity.transparent #phonology.onehand #semantic.salutation
As a Noun: 1. A greeting made to someone. As a Verb or Adjective: 1. To say hello to someone. Interactive: 1. Used to acknowledge someone when you meet them. English = 'Hello.'

hello, hi

Auslan SignbankDictionary#4148 hello.doff
#auslan-signbank #everywhere #wa #nt #sa #qld #nsw #act #vic #tas #iconicity.obscure #phonology.onehand #semantic.salutation
Interactive: 1. Used alone, especially by men, to greet someone. English = 'Hello.'

health, well (healthy), healthy, How are you

Auslan SignbankDictionary#2374 well1a
#auslan-signbank #everywhere #wa #nt #sa #qld #nsw #act #vic #tas #iconicity.opaque #lexis.signed-english #phonology.onehand #semantic.health #semantic.quality #semantic.salutation
As a Noun: 1. The state in which you are fit and well and not ill. English = health. As a Verb or Adjective: 1. To be not suffering from any illness. English = (be) well, (be) healthy. Interactive: 1. Used alone with a questioning look to greet someone. English = 'How are you?' 2. Used alone in response to someone's greeting. English = 'Fine, thanks!', 'I'm well...' As Modifier: 1. Often used before or after verb (action) signs to mean that the action was performed correctly or with great skill as a direct translation of the English adverb 'well'. 2. Widely used in this sense though it is resisted by many native signers who prefer to use a form of the sign 'good' in this sense.

invite into, admit (let in), guest, usher, usherette

Auslan SignbankDictionary#2350 invite-into1a
#auslan-signbank #everywhere #wa #nt #sa #qld #nsw #act #vic #tas #iconicity.translucent #morph.directional-sign #phonology.onehand #semantic.salutation
As a Noun: 1. A person who works in a cinema or theatre who shows people where to sit. English = usher (male or female), usherette (female only). 2. Someone who is staying in your home or is at an occasion because you have invited them. English = guest. As a Verb or Adjective: 1. To politely show someone where they should go often with a wave of the hand and letting them walk slightly in front of you. English = usher. 2. To politely indicate to someone with a wave of the hand that they should enter a building, room or doorway. English = usher in, invite in, admit into. Interactive: 1. Used alone to politely indicate the direction in which someone should go. English = 'This way, please.' 2. Used alone to politely invite someone to enter into a building, room or doorway; or to indicate to a guest to go ahead and do something. English = 'Do come in!'; 'Be my guest!'

welcome, welcoming, hospitable

Auslan SignbankDictionary#2694 welcome1a
#auslan-signbank #everywhere #wa #nt #sa #qld #nsw #act #vic #tas #iconicity.translucent #lexis.signed-english #phonology.double-handed #phonology.symmetrical #semantic.salutation
As a Noun: 1. The act of greeting someone in a friendly way when they arrive somewhere. English = welcome. As a Verb or Adjective: 1. To greet someone in a friendly way when they arrive somewhere. English = to welcome. 2. To be friendly and welcoming to guests and strangers. English = (be) welcoming, (be) hospitable. Interactive: 1. Used alone when welcoming someone to tell them to come inside a room or building. English = 'Come in!'

excuse, excuse me

Auslan SignbankDictionary#677 excuse1a
#auslan-signbank #everywhere #wa #nt #sa #qld #nsw #act #vic #tas #lexis.fingerspell #phonology.double-handed #phonology.symmetrical #semantic.salutation
As a Noun: 1. A reason which you give in order to explain why something has been done, has not been done, or will not be done. English = excuse. As a Verb or Adjective: 1. To let someone free of a duty or responsibility. English = excuse. 2. To explain why you have done something wrong in an attempt to make yourself seem less bad. English = excuse yourself, make excuses. Interactive: 1. Used alone to indicate to your addressee that you have to suddenly break the communication with them and leave or direct your attention elsewhere to someone else. English = 'If you'll excuse me...' 2. Used alone to indicate to people that you are aware you are causing some interference to them as you squeeze past them in a crowded place or if you walk between them and the people they are talking to. English = 'Excuse me!'

Good night

Auslan SignbankDictionary#3363 good-night.NTH
#auslan-signbank #qld #nsw #act #lexis.regional #phonology.double-handed #semantic.salutation
Interactive: 1. Used alone to say goodbye to people in the evening or at night. English = 'Good night.'

Good night

Auslan SignbankDictionary#3304 good-night.STH
#auslan-signbank #wa #nt #sa #vic #tas #lexis.regional #phonology.onehand #semantic.salutation
Interactive: 1. Used alone to say goodbye to people in the evening or at night. English = 'Good night.'

goodness, virtue, good, virtuous, approve, adore, well, How are you

Auslan SignbankDictionary#3342 good1a
#auslan-signbank #everywhere #wa #nt #sa #qld #nsw #act #vic #tas #lexis.signed-english #morph.directional-sign #phonology.onehand #semantic.judge #semantic.quality #semantic.salutation
As a Noun: 1. The quality of being desirable, acceptable or right, or behaviour which is gentle and kind. English = goodness, virtue. As a Verb or Adjective: 1. To be desirable, acceptable, or right or behave in such a way. English = (be) good, (be) virtuous. 2. To say something is desirable, acceptable or right. English = to approve of. 3. To love something or someone a lot. English = to adore. Interactive: 1. Used alone on meeting someone (usually with a questioning look) to acknowledge them and as the standard form of greeting. English = 'How are you?', 'How are you going?' 2. Used alone as the standard response to a greeting. English = 'Fine, thanks', 'Good, thank you'. As Modifier: 1. Used before or after a verb (action) sign to mean that the action is done correctly, properly or skilfully, or according to certain moral principles. English = well.